Courier columns – 30 Years Ago with Joanne Mires – Hundreds at funeral for candy firm head

courier-columns

Edited from the Saint Croix Courier the week of Wednesday, Dec. 4 , 1990

St. Stephen looks at economic future

St. Stephen

With this province exporting more than 80 per cent of its goods to New England, St. Stephen should seriously target related industries like warehousing.

Dan Mackin, manager of the Canada Employment Centre in St. Stephen, made this point as part of his presentation to the St. Stephen Economic Development Committee meeting on Monday evening.

“We need to build transportation facilities, support services and warehouses,” Mackin says. “We have a lot to offer those possibly interested in locating here. Clean air, reasonable cost of living, location near a port, shopping and an adequate labour supply.”

More than 15 people have prepared briefs for the committee, which heard some of them on Thursday evening at the St. Stephen Legion Hall, and more on Monday at the Milltown Legion Hall. The hearings will continue Wednesday evening at the Milltown Legion, beginning at 7 p.m.

Mayor Allan Gillmor, who initiated the meetings, says he has been pleasantly surprised by the interest in the idea.

“The hearings are picking up momentum, and at least 16 to 20 people will be presenting,” Gillmor says. “It’s the ideas which are important here. We have to change an attitude. We have to change a downturn in the economy into an opportunity.”

That beets all

Erica O’Neil showed a 6 ¼ lb. beet that her grandfather, Sherwin Ingersoll, found growing in his Seal Cove turnip patch on Grand Manan. The beet was 7 1/2” in diameter and had a 25” circumference. The beet was cooked for three hours then eaten. Not even woody.

Personals

Grand Manan

Lobster fishermen are bringing in fairly good catches from off shore but the price is not good. Presently the price is $3.00 per pound.

Old Ridge

Mrs. Wilfred Morrison returned home after a bus tour to Orlando, Florida, where she attended the cloggers’ convention.

Rolling Dam

James Goss of Quispamsis was an overnight guest of his mother, Mrs. Jean Goss.

Pomeroy Ridge

Several from the community attended the torch light parade held at Oak Hill, Sunday evening.

60 YEARS AGO – 1960

A.D. Ganong passes

Hundreds at funeral for candy firm head

New Brunswick said goodbye to one of its most noteworthy sons last week when funeral services for A.D. Ganong were held at his home in St. Stephen. Dignitaries, businessmen and friends from many areas of the province attended the services for the man who invented the chocolate bar and was for 40 years president of Ganong Brothers Limited. Mr. Ganong died a week ago Monday in the Saint John General Hospital following a stroke suffered just one day earlier. He was 83.

Open movies this Sunday

Regular Sunday movies will be shown in St. Stephen for the first time this Sunday. The unprecedented move to open the Queen Theatre on Sunday was made by the St. Stephen-Milltown Lions Club over the objections of the Ministerial Association and spokesmen for virtually every religious group in the area. An appeal by churchmen to St. Stephen Town Council requesting Sunday movies be outlawed went by the board when it was learned the Town has no bylaw governing that eventuality. The Lions Club’s move is being taken in the interest of charity with movie patrons to be admitted free. A silver donation for charity will be requested during the show. The show, “Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison!”

90 YEARS AGO – 1930

In the drawing for turkeys at the Sanitary Meat and Fish Market last Saturday, T.A. Laughlin, S.E. Mehan, W.I. Todd and Ralph Evans of St. Stephen and Clyde Hall of Calais were the fortunate winners.

Milltown

Hieatt’s double loaf of bread reduced from 25 cents to 20 cents is meeting with a ready sale at Roy Speedy’s store.

120 YEARS AGO – 1900

Snow fell during Tuesday night and about all day yesterday. It was accompanied by quite a gale from the northeast and the roads are badly blocked.

Welshpool

James A. Calder, prominent merchant here, is doing quite a business in cutting and barreling smoked herring, for which a ready market is had at New York and elsewhere. The work gives employment to fifteen or twenty boys and is carried on in a building built for the purpose. Mr. Calder recently purchased twenty thousand boxes of smoked herring, which are now being prepared for the market.